Love at First Sight in The Tempest


William Shakespeare
 Love at First Sight  ---The Tempest-----Act-III Scene 1 ----Lines 1-95.
The scene opens with Ferdinand’s soliloquy. Prospero has ordered him to carry firewood for testing his love for his daughter, Miranda.
Though the task is painful, he does it with joy for the sake of his lady love, Miranda. Her sympathy  and concern for him make his hard labour very pleasant. Miranda enters and asks him not to work very hard. She wants lightning to burn up all the firewood. Prospero appears invisible and overhears their talk. Miranda further says that the fire wood itself will weep for troubling Ferdinand. She asks him to take rest as his father is busy at his study, and can not see him. Ferdinand replies that he has to finish his work by sunset, and still there are still thousands of wooden pieces to be carried. Miranda offers to carry the logs when he rests, but Ferdinand does not allow her to do that.
                   The invisible Prospero is rejoiced to see the growing love between them. He observes that Miranda is like an infected worm, affected by love. Miranda pities Ferdinand because he looks tired. Ferdinand says that when he is with her, he is as fresh as one is in the morning, even though the night is approaching. He asks for her name so that he can pray for her. She tells her name in spite of her father’s command not to reveal her identity. Ferdinand praises her, saying that she is perfect and peerless. She is the best woman he has seen. While the other women have one defect or the other, Miranda has no defect. Miranda says that in the past, she has seen no men except her father. She swears her love for Ferdinand and says that she wants no other companion, but him. Ferdinand wants to become her slave, and he does not value his position as a prince or a king.
                            Again, the invisible Prospero feels very happy, and while describing their love as ‘two most rare affections’  ,he invokes God’s blessings on them. Miranda tells that she wants to become Ferdinand’s wife. If that is not possible, she will be content to remain as his maid servant. Prospero is greatly pleased with Ferdinand’s great love for Miranda,  and Miranda’s affection towards him. He leaves the place, saying that he has to do many important things to do,  before supper time.

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